Get a grip!

by Gareth on September 29, 2011

David Mitchell (on his soapbox) tells it like it is, with an appropriate degree of emphasis. By way of being a place-holder to mark my return to NZ and climate blogging. Currently overwhelmed by the amount of catching up of all sorts that I have to do, but something like normal service will resume shortly. Meanwhile, my heartfelt thanks to Bryan for doing so much work in my absence, to Simon for his thoughtful contributions, and to Glenn and John for keeping the Climate Show ticking over so well. Thanks all!

[Hat tip: Dan at Irregular Climate.]

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Carol Cowan September 29, 2011 at 6:10 pm

Welcome home, Gareth.

CTG September 29, 2011 at 7:05 pm

Welcome back, Gareth. Bryan has indeed done a splendid job in your absence, and will hopefully now get a well-earned rest – for a day or two :-)

That is a splendid piece from David Mitchell, who is a very clever chap. I have been trying to phrase that argument for a while now, and he has done it better in three minutes than I have been able to manage in a year.

There is a formal way of presenting his argument using game theory, but it essentially says the same thing – the consequences of adding more CO₂ to the atmosphere are so severe that it requires hard proof that it won’t be a problem in order for us not to do something about it. Unless you are a politician, of course…

Gareth September 30, 2011 at 11:20 am

Thanks C & C. Mitchell is, as you say CTG, right on the money. I’ve been pointing out that a rational statement of the problem places the burden of proof on those demanding inaction since the year dot – he just does it better than me, and to a wider audience… ;-)

bill September 30, 2011 at 1:42 pm

Mitchell’s a smart cookie – tying in neatly with the just-posted NASA space station videos check out Mitchell’s narration for Around the World in 90 Minutes, a documentary about what happens in the world during the station’s 90 minute sweep around the globe… This includes showing the small town of 15 000 people in France that happens to have the same number of citizens as the number of people added to the global population during each station orbit! Witty but disturbing…

Can’t say I agree with Mitchell on his SoapBox about ‘LOL’, though… ;-)

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