The Climate Show #6: Monckton and the iron in the ocean

by Gareth on February 3, 2011

A very wide ranging Climate Show this week, with Dr Philip Boyd of NIWA and Otago University explaining why fertilising the oceans to soak up more carbon is not likely to be our “get out of jail free” card, John Cook of Skeptical Science introducing the new Monckton Myths section of the site, plus interesting new papers on Atlantic warming adding to the Arctic’s problems, an accurate prediction of last year’s Pakistan flooding, and the coolest 1970s Datsun on the planet.

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Show notes below the fold.

Arctic currents warmer than at any time in last 2000 years: Discovery blog with nice map.

Press release: e! Science News

Cite: Enhanced Modern Heat Transfer to the Arctic by Warm Atlantic Water
Robert F. Spielhagen, Kirstin Werner, Steffen Aagaard Sørensen, Katarzyna Zamelczyk, Evguenia Kandiano, Gereon Budeus, Katrine Husum, Thomas M. Marchitto, and Morten Hald
Science 28 January 2011: 331 (6016), 450-453. [DOI:10.1126/science.1197397]

Abstract: The Arctic is responding more rapidly to global warming than most other areas on our planet. Northward-flowing Atlantic Water is the major means of heat advection toward the Arctic and strongly affects the sea ice distribution. Records of its natural variability are critical for the understanding of feedback mechanisms and the future of the Arctic climate system, but continuous historical records reach back only ~150 years. Here, we present a multidecadal-scale record of ocean temperature variations during the past 2000 years, derived from marine sediments off Western Svalbard (79°N). We find that early–21st-century temperatures of Atlantic Water entering the Arctic Ocean are unprecedented over the past 2000 years and are presumably linked to the Arctic amplification of global warming.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/jan/31/world-carbon-dioxide-emissions-country-data-co2#

Source data: http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/IEDIndex3.cfm?tid=90&pid=44&aid=8

Pakistan floods “could have been predicted”.

ECMWF long range forecasts here (click on the map, and then select the part of the world you want to see).

Feature interview

Dr Philip Boyd of NIWA and the University of Otago discusses the new IGBP report on ocean fertilisation as a means of sequestering carbon. He’s phytoplankton ecologist whose research interests include the environmental control of phytoplankton processes, the oceans iron biogeochemical cycle, and the biogeochemical coupling of surface ocean with deep water processes (the so-called biological pump).

Press release

Report pdf

The Monckton Special, with John Cook of Skeptical Science.

Monckton Myths

Climate Sensitivity

Sea level rise

It was Tom Lehrer, Glenn…

Solutions:

It’s the year of green vehicles, and EVs in particular:

Tesla announce an electric SUV

EV racing is taking off.

Quite some Datsun…

Thanks to our media partners: Celsias.co.nz, Scoop and KiwiFM.

Theme music: A Drop In The Ocean by The Bads.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

cindy February 4, 2011 at 12:34 pm

hmmm… new website not quite up yet – or broken link?

Gareth February 4, 2011 at 12:42 pm

Glenn’s got the site ready in dummy form, but needs to post the old shows before he does the domain transfer… Shouldn’t take too long. ;-)

Glenn February 4, 2011 at 1:12 pm

“Shouldn’t take too long”. Ha! That’s optimistic. Okay righto, I’ll get right to it…

TBWood February 4, 2011 at 8:51 pm
Doug Mackie February 6, 2011 at 11:26 am

Is the reason the trolls have avoided this thread is that there are NZ experts available to rebut them? Or that they lack the attention span to have listened – for all the other issues they bleat on about someone else has done the “thinking” that can be cut and pasted?

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